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                              Students Mobility Programme

Why students mobility programme?

Wbelieve that learning does not stop at the classroom door. More often, real life experiences contribute more to learning than what is only learned inside the academia. This is one of the reasons why educational tours are organised and are considered as part of the curriculum.

We very much welcome innovative ideas for the programme which we suggest could include the elements of: 

  • Introduction to British and English national culture, history, language, social plus political economy and heritage
  • Introduction to the national education system
  • Visiting historical places and museums in the UK
  • Meeting with the eminent educationists, writers, journalists, social workers, British politicians and exchanging views with them
  • Visiting British media centres/studios and some such like institutions 

What will we do for the students who plan to come?

We will arrange ground and /or air transportation, lodging, site seeing tours, dining for the group. All of our group tours will be conducted by trained, experienced and CRB (Criminal Records Bureau) checked tour director/guide during the entire group tour.

 

 Costs and fares:

Please contact with our local co-ordinator where available or head office in London to find approximate trip costs  and fares as it is subject to change depending on country of origin, number of students,air tickets and availabilty of hotel reservation.

Please send e-mail providing your contact details to info@londonmediacollege.org.uk We will get in touch with you within 24 hours. 

The British Museum 

 

The British Museum is a museum in London dedicated to human history and culture. It’s permanent collection, numbering some 8 million works, is among the largest and most comprehensive in existence and originates from all continents, illustrating and documenting the story of human culture from it’s beginnings to the present.

The British Library 

The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom. The library is a major research library, holding over 150 million items from many countries, in many languages and in many formats, both print and digital: books, manuscripts, journals, newspapers, magazines, sound and music recordings, videos, play-scripts, patents, databases, maps, stamps, prints, drawings. The Library’s collections include around 14 million books, along with substantial holdings of manuscripts and historical items dating back as far as 2000 BC. The British Library is the largest library in the world by number of items cataloged as a legal deposit library. The British Library receives copies of all books produced in the United Kingdom and Ireland, including a significant proportion of overseas
titles that are distributed in the UK. It also has a programme for content acquisitions. The British Library adds some three million items every year occupying 9.6 kilometres (6.0 mi) of new shelf space.

Buckingham Palace

The Buckingham Palace has served as the official London residence of Britain’s sovereigns since 1837 and today is the administrative headquarters of the Monarch. Buckingham Palace has 775 rooms. These include 19 State rooms, 52 Royal and guest bedrooms, 188 staff bedrooms, 92 offices and 78 bathrooms. In measurements, the building is 108 metres long across the front, 120 metres deep
(including the central quadrangle) and 24 metres high.

Hyde Park

The Hyde Park is one of the largest parks in London, and one of the Royal Parks of London, famous for its Speakers’ Corner. park is divided in two by the Serpentine and the Long Water Hyde Park covers 142 hectares (350 acres) and Kensington Gardens covers 111 hectares (275 acre), giving an overall area of 253 hectares (625 acres), making the combined area larger than the Principality of Monaco (196 hectares or 480 acres), though smaller than New York City’s Central Park (341 hectares or 840 acres) and Dublin’s Phoenix park 707 hectares (1,750 acres). To the southeast side, in a corner of the park, is the Hyde Park Corner. Although, during daylight, the two parks merge seamlessly into each other, Kensington Gardens closes at dusk but Hyde Park remains open throughout the
year from 5 am until midnight. The Hyde Park is the largest of four parks which form a chain from the entrance of Kensington Palace through the Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park, plus via Hyde Park Corner and Green Park (19 hectares) past the main entrance to the Buckingham Palace and then on through St James’s Park (23 hectares) to Horse Guards Parade in Whitehall.

The British Parliament

The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the UK Parliament or the British Parliament, the Westminster Parliament or by the metonym “Westminster”, which is the supreme legislative body in the United Kingdom, British Crown dependencies and the British overseas territories. It alone possesses legislative supremacy and thereby ultimate
power over all other political bodies in the UK and its territories. Its head is the Sovereign of the United Kingdom (currently Queen Elizabeth II) and its seat is the Palace of Westminster in Westminster, London. The parliament is bicameral, consisting of an upper house (the House of Lords) and a lower house (the House of Commons).

London Underground

The London Underground (also known as the Tube or simply the Underground) is a public metro system serving a large part of Greater London and parts of the counties of Buckinghamshire, Hertfordshire Essex, Middlesex, Kent and Surrey. The system serves 270 stations and has 402 kilometres (250 mi) of track, 55% of which is above ground. The network incorporates the world’s first underground railway, which is the Metropolitan Railway, which opened in 1863 and is now part of the Circle, Hammersmith & City and Metropolitan lines and the first line to operate underground electric traction trains, the City & South London Railway in 1890, now part of the Northern line. The network has expanded to 11 lines, and in 2012/13 carried over 1 billion passengers.

London Tube Network

The system’s first tunnels were built just below the surface using the cut and cover method. Later, circular tunnels – which give rise to its nickname the Tube – were dug through the London Clay at a deeper level. The early lines were marketed as the UNDERGROUND in the early 20th century on maps and signs at central London stations. The private companies that owned and ran the railways were merged in 1933 to form the London Passenger Transport Board. The current operator, London Underground Limited (LUL), is a wholly owned subsidiary of Transport for London (TFL), the statutory corporation responsible for most elements of the transport network in Greater London.

Tower Bridge

Tower Bridge (built 1886–1894) is a combined bascule and suspension bridge in London which crosses the river Thames. It is close to the Tower of London, from which it takes its name, and has become an iconic symbol of London. The bridge consists of two towers tied together at the upper level by means of two horizontal walkways, designed to withstand the horizontal forces exerted by the suspended sections of the bridge on the landward sides of the towers. The vertical component ofthe forces in the suspended sections and the vertical reactions of the two walkways are carried by the two robust towers. The bascule pivots and operating machinery are housed in the base of each tower.The bridge’s present colour scheme dates from 1977, when it was painted red, white and blue for Queen Elizabeth II’s silver jubilee. Originally it was painted a mid greenish-blue colour.

Big Ben

Big Ben is the nickname for the great bell of the clock at the north end of the Palace of Westminster in London, and often extended to refer to the clock and the clock tower. The tower is officially known as the Elizabeth Tower (prior to being renamed in 2012 it was known as simply “Clock
Tower”) to celebrate the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II. The tower holds the largest four-faced chiming clock in the world and is the third-tallest free-standing clock tower. The tower was completed in 1858 and had its 150th anniversary on 31 May 2009, during which celebratory events took place. The tower has become one of the most prominent symbols of the United Kingdom and is often in the establishing shots of films set in London.

The London Eye

The London Eye is a giant Ferris wheel on the South Bank of the River Thames in London. Also known as the Millennium Wheel, its official name was originally the British Airways London Eye, then the Merlin Entertainments London Eye, and since January 2011, the EDF Energy London Eye. The entire structure is 135 metres (443 ft) tall and the wheel has a diameter of 120 metres (394 ft). It is currently Europe’s tallest Ferris wheel, the most popular paid tourist attraction in the United Kingdom with over 3.5 million visitors annually, and has made many appearances in popular culture.

Westfield Stratford City

The Westfield Stratford City is a shopping centre in Stratford, London, owned by the Westfield Group. The centre opened on 13 September 2011. With a total retail floor area of 1,883,700 square feet (175,000 m2), it is one of the largest urban shopping centres in Europe. It is the third-largest shopping centre in the United Kingdom by retail space
behind the Metro Centre and the Trafford Centre. Taking the surrounding shopping area into account, it is the largest urban shopping centre in the European Union in terms of size. The Westfield Stratford City is adjacent to the London Olympic Park, East Village, Stratford Regional and Stratford International stations. The shopping centre is anchored by a 240,000 sq ft (22,000 m2) John Lewis department store, a 32,000 sq ft (3,000 m2) Waitrose supermarket, a 136,000 sq ft (12,600 m2) Marks and Spencer department store, a 24 hour casino (Aspers) and a seventeen screen all-digital Venue cinema. The shopping centre also has a 267 room Premier Inn hotel, and another hotel with 350 rooms. The shopping centre has approximately 300 stores and 70 restaurants.

City of London

The City of London is a city within London. It constituted most of London from its settlement by the Romans in the 1st century AD to the Middle Ages, but the conurbation has since grown far beyond the City’s borders. The City is now only a tiny part of the metropolis of Greater London, though it remains a notable part of central London. It holds city status in its own right and is also a separate ceremonial county. It is widely referred to simply as the City and is also colloquially known as the Square Mile, as it is 1.12 sq mi (2.90 km2), i.e., just over 1 sq mi, in area. Both of these terms are also often used as metonyms for the United Kingdom’s trading and financial services industries, which continue a notable history of being largely based in the City.

Shakespeare’s Birth Place

Shakespeare’s Birth place is a restored 16th-century half-timbered house situated in Henley Street, Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire, England, where it is believed that William Shakespeare was born in 1564 and spent his childhood years. It is now a small museum open to the public and a popular visitor attraction, owned and managed by the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust. It has been referred to as “a Mecca for all lovers of literature”.

Canary Wharf

 

Canary Wharf is a major business district located in Tower Hamlets, London. It is one of London’s two main financial centres – along with the traditional City of London – and contains many of the UK’s tallest buildings, including the second-tallest, One Canada Square is the address. Canary Wharf contains around 14,000,000 square feet of office and retail space, of which around 7,900,000 square feet is owned by Canary Wharf Group. Around 105,000 people work in Canary Wharf and it is home to the world or European headquarters of numerous major banks, professional services firms and media organisations including Barclays, Citigroup, Clifford Chance, Credit Suisse, Infosys, Fitch Ratings,
HSBC, J.P. Morgan, KPMG, MetLife, Morgan Stanley, RBC, Skadden, State Street and

Tower of London

Her Majesty’s Royal Palace and Fortress, known as the Tower of London, is a historic castle located on the north bank of the River Thames in central London. It lies within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, separated from the eastern edge of the square mile of the City of London by the open space known as Tower Hill. It was founded towards the end of 1066 as part of the Norman Conquest of England. The White Tower, which gives the entire castle its name, was built by William the Conqueror in 1078, and was a resented symbol of oppression, inflicted upon London by the new ruling elite. The castle was used as a prison from 1100 (Ranulf Flambard) until 1952 (Kray twins), although that was not its primary purpose. A grand palace early in its history, it served as a royal residence. As a whole, the Tower is a complex of several buildings set within two concentric rings of >defensive walls and a moat. There were several phases of expansion, mainly under Kings Richard the Lionheart, Henry III, and Edward I in the 12th and 13th centuries. The general layout established by the late 13th century remains despite later activity on the site.

Madame Tussauds 

 

Madame Tussauds is a wax museum in London with branches in a number of major cities. It was founded by wax sculptor Marie Tussaud and was formerly known as “Madame Tussaud’s”; Madame Tussauds is a major tourist attraction in London, displaying waxworks of historical and royal figures, film stars, sports stars and infamous murderers. Madame Tussauds is owned and operated by Merlin Entertainments.

 

Windsor Castle 

 

Windsor Castle is a royal residence at Windsor in the English county of Berkshire. The castle is notable for its long association with the English and later British royal family and also for its architecture. The original castle was built in the 11th century after the Norman invasion by William the Conqueror. Since the time of Henry I, it has been used by succeeding monarchs and is the longest-occupied palace in Europe. The castle’s lavish, early 19th-century State Apartments are architecturally significant, described by art historian Hugh Roberts as “a superb and unrivalled sequence of rooms widely regarded as the finest and most complete expression of later Georgian taste”. The castle includes the 15th-century St George’s Chapel, considered by historian John Martin Robinson to be “one of the supreme achievements of English Perpendicular Gothic” design. More than five hundred people live and work in Windsor Castle.

 Piccadilly Circus

 

Piccadilly Circus is a road junction and public space of London’s West End in the City of Westminster, built in 1819 to connectRegent Street with Piccadilly. In this context a circus, from the Latin word meaning “circle”, is a round open space at a street junction. Piccadilly now links directly to the theatres on Shaftesbury Avenue, as well as the Haymarket, Coventry Street (onwards toLeicester Square), and Glasshouse Street. The Circus is close to major shopping and entertainment areas in the West End. Its status as a major traffic junction has made Piccadilly Circus a busy meeting place and a tourist attraction in its own right. The Circus is particularly known for its video display and neon signs mounted on the corner building on the northern side, as well as the Shaftesbury memorial fountain and statue of Eros. It is surrounded by several notable buildings, including the London Pavilion, Criterion Restaurant and Criterion Theatre. Directly underneath the plaza is Piccadilly Circus tube station, part of theLondon Underground system.

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